What Happened To TIM? (Part 1)


T.I.M. talks If you've been following this podcast for a while, then you may be wondering, what happened to T.I.M.?

If you go to http://theindependentmusician.com you'll notice a landing page, and how things link back to this site.

Here's the podcast page now. Blog posts, and show notes are here now. Things are different, right?

More than that you've most likely noticed a drop off in the episodes.

Well, in this post, I'll be sharing some news, though I can't share everything yet.

An Update On T.I.M.

Right around the same time I launched T.I.M. Talks in March, I started contracting for a publishing company in Nashville, doing their Wordpress administration, social media management, and digital marketing campaigns.

T.I.M. was a part of my plans going back to last year. I had this grand vision. After doing the CMB Podcast in 2013, and seeing some measure of success - at least for a small fry like me (996 subscribers was a big deal in my mind) - I got excited about how much of the internet marketing hacks that I was learning about actually worked.

Building an audience online was something that I had always thought was important for indie musicians these days, and as I began seeing CMB grow, I wondered if I could transfer what I was learning to indie artists looking to build an audience themselves.

Looking at several case studies where indie artists were using free content to leverage their growth online, I had a vision to reverse engineer their success and talk about this new way of doing music business. Since I had seen a little bit myself with CMB, I thought I'd embark on a journey of the blogging musician.

Content marketing is a big deal these days and I wanted to explore it as an indie artist coach. I also wanted to record the journey and publish it in the form of an audio podcast.

But here's where I went wrong....

I still completely believe in this stuff, but I made a decision that was a mistake. Don't do what I did:

To give myself the time to commit to this venture, I decided to scale back at my job, get paid less, and dive into the world of indie-entrepreneurship. I had set a date at my job to step out of some of the roles I was in, and go part time.

It was a huge pay cut, and one that I was confident I'd be able to make up for after a few months of producing products and services for my audience.

I had huge plans for T.I.M.

But I wasn't ready.

And, at the same time, other work began to show up on my plate that I hadn't accounted for.

I underestimated the amount of time that was required to get to the place where I'm bringing in the income needed to support my family.

Yes, I'm having to eat humble pie and confess that I over extended myself.

The Full Story

Someday, I'll share even more of the full story, but at this juncture I have to put things with T.I.M. Talks on pause.

My priorities are:

  1. My family
  2. My personal growth
  3. My work
  4. My church

I will likely do blog posts periodically here at the blog, but the next few months, I'm going all in with the priorities above.

I do have several unpublished episodes of T.I.M. that may come to the surface sometime, but I can't promise anything on when that will be.

From one T.I.M. to another, thank you.

And don't go away, because I plan to pick certain things back up in the future. This blog will always be here, and you can always reach me here if you ever have any questions about anything.

Content Marketing For Musicians

In this new series of the T.I.M. Talks podcast, we'll be talking about content marketing for musicians. This post will grow and change as new episodes in the series will be added to it.

Listen or download to the episode above!

Content Marketing For Musicians

Content marketing is all the rage these days. Seems like everyone and there mother's uncle is a content marketing guru, trying to sell you their over priced SEO services.

For better or for worse, content marketing isn't just a buzz phrase, but a real thing that is here to stay.

What is content marketing?

Content marketing is simply the use of free content - whether it's a blog post, or a video, or a podcast episode, or an info graphic - to serve an audience looking for a specific solution to a real problem.

Quality content marketing is the combination of keyword research, search engine optimization, and some kind of conversion on a call to action. You have them on your site, you have done well, but it doesn't end there. Converting them into a subscriber or a lead is that hard to get next step.

Listen back to this series each week to get my thoughts on how musicians and artists should be leveraging content marketing in their music career to build an audience online.

#21 What's Your DAW? (And The Winner Of April Drawing)

In this episode I announce the winner of the April TIM Talks drawing…

Congrats to Stephen Cowart!!

What's Your Favorite DAW?

In this episode I ask the question, “what’s your DAW of choice?”

If you’re not sure what a D.A.W. is, it stands for digital audio workstation. It's basically the software you use when you record. So what is your recording software of choice?

Protools? Reason? Ableton? Logic? Cuebase?

Let me know in the comments of today's episode!

#20 Learn How To Launch (Part 2)

[alert type="success"]If you're reading this on April 27th, 2015, Get all your entries in this month's drawing here![/alert] Don't just release an album. Learn how to launch it.

We've been talking about a different approach to selling music online the last few episodes. From setting up your store on your site to understanding how to apply what is commonly called the marketing funnel if you want to develop super fans.

The last episode and this one is all about how to pull off a successful launch.

If you haven't read the book yet, get Jeff Walker's book Launch here.

Learn How To Launch

Don't just release an album. Launch a product. A premium package that surrounds the album. Yes it will be a lot more work. But you can also charge a lot more than $10.

Think closer to $100.

Can it be done?

Absolutely. People will pay for things when they're super fans. And if you do this right, you'll have super fans that are advocates in the end.

Maybe your elite package is a huge bundle of extra music that will never get publicly released, some extra merchandise, or some tickets to a private show, anything and everything that goes above and beyond a 12 song album release.

Think big. And think outside the box.

Below is a timeline of what a launch sequence could look like for an indie artist.

Keep in mind, all of this is directed to your email list.

  • Announce a new record coming soon
  • Plan three exclusive videos, telling the story of the new album
  • Release the videos in a sequence, dripped out over the course of a week.
  • In each video and email that goes with it, add some element of surprise they weren't expecting
  • Build anticipation to the launch day
  • Open the cart on launch day
  • Keep open for only 5 to 6 days
  • Close launch

Let's look at this in detail....

Announce a new record is coming soon, and you'll be doing an exclusive launch of the new record with extra bonuses and goodies the public will never see. All of this happens before you release your album in any of the digital stores (if you decide to at all).

When things are ready, you do a pre-launch with a free video series for someone to opt in for. This is your lead magnet.

During the pre-launch sequence, you're providing free, valuable pieces of your story that surrounds your new project. Videos with behind the scene stories, unplugged performances, or anything special that your creative mind can think of.

This is value.

And because it's exclusive, people will feel like they're in the inner circle. People love this. With a little social proof that others can see, this pre-launch sequence builds anticipation for launch day.

When launch day comes, the power of reciprocity kicks in.

From being generous and giving away free stuff, people will naturally want to give back to you. When you ask for the sale, they will buy.

But not all of them....

And this is where scarcity comes into play.

If you have a limited window for folks to purchase your release package, they will know that they have to act. And act quickly too.

But many will ride the fence all the way to the end, which is why you MUST follow up during the launch week with a launch sequence filled with CTAs (calls to action).

"Hurry. The cart closes tonight, and then this offer will be gone...."

Something like that on the last day of the launch week.

What Comes After?

After launch week is over, and you have new buyers, you're delivering on your promise, interacting with them and getting their feedback to see how you can make the next one an even bigger success.

At this point you might have a public release date that you begin building towards, with a specific number of super fans who you have just earned from your launch.

Maybe you only release it on iTunes, and through your online store, when you release to the public. And maybe you wait months to release it to the free streaming platforms (or never do it all).

Listen To Part One Below....